Posts Tagged ‘book’

Cyclepedia.

March 7, 2011

Thames and Hudson recently asked if I’d like to peruse a pre-publication copy of this book and, of course, without wavering I said yes.

A few days later a thud on the door mat indicated the arrival of said book. The following hours saw me sat in front of the fire, gawping at pages upon pages of pure -dare I say it- bike pron. It’s all good, with pro studio photographs of TT bikes, golden era racing cycles, randonneurs, mixtes, porteurs and also classic examples of radical bike design like the Elettromontaggi SRL Zoombike, the most beautiful folding bike I have ever seen!

As far as bike collections are concerned this one of Michael Embacher is the best, bar none and the fact that it is now in print, with accompanying words and a foreword by none other than Paul Smith means this book is not to be missed. Buy it, borrow it from a pal who has it, whatever. You’ll love it.

Cyclepedia, a tour of iconic bicycle designs is out mid march and you can also go to the free launch party at LMNH in London on 16th March.

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The Hemingway Way.

September 28, 2010

I just got back from a fishing trip in Snowdonia and while the car journey through the Welsh valleys was beautiful and at times spellbinding, I simply wanted to be on my bike because as Hemingway rightly wrote:

It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.

Bobet.

August 20, 2010

When French cyclist Louison Bobet won the Tour de France in 1953, 1954, and 1955 he became the first rider to win the event three consecutive times. His victories came through sheer hard work and determination.

I heard about the Bobet brothers whilst reading an excerpt out of Jean Bobet’s book ‘Tomorrow we ride’ in Rouleur magazine. Promtly after putting the magazine down I went online and bought the book.

Not being a big reader ( you can probably tell this by my mediocre use of the English language ) I read a little bit of it, put it down and forgot about it as it lay under my bed for a few months.

I went on holiday a couple weeks back and needing something to read and not wanting to splash cash on throw away comics, I reached under my bed for the unfinished book.

Now I am no book critic so I won’t even try to ‘review’ it but I can truly say that this book is great, it’s written beatifully by Jean the English scholar and for me specifically it holds my attention, something most books cannot do. So if you are looking for some letter forms to wrap your brain matter around, look no further.

You can also find a great write up on Louison Bobet’s racing career over at DM’s blog.

Essential Reading.

April 28, 2010

The second volume in the series of Rapha Guides, the Great Road Climbs of the Southern Alps continues our journey along the roads and cols of Europe. Written by Graeme Fife with the photography of Pete Drinkell, the book captures the beauty and intrigue of the southern regions of the Alps, exploring climbs and roads steeped in the history of road racing and beyond.

Moving from the Col d’Izoard, close to the French-Italian border and over the mighty Cime de la Bonette, the book then encounters Mont Ventoux in Provence, a trip across the border to Italy and then through the central southern Alps to finish on the Riviera.

As well as full bleed, double-page images, the book features hand-illustrated maps and col profiles. Fife’s narrative, crafted with lashings of historical references, cultural observations and road racing snapshots is matched by the powerful photography of Drinkell.

Yes please, I’ll certainly go for one of these.
swoop here.

100 Years of Bicycle posters.

April 1, 2010

This looks like one amazing book. Unfortunately it was pressed in 1973 so the chances of me getting my greasy mitts on one is like, well, slim to none.

Excerpt from this, the 1973 first edition.
This year marks the one hundredth anniversary of the two machines that have had a profound influence on us. It was roughly in 1872 that color lithography, which made colorful pictorial posters possible, came into popular use; it was also about 1872 that the modern bicycle evolved. It is the coincidence of these two inventions—the modern bicycle and the modern poster—converging and maturing at about the same time, that interested me. It is this founding and parallel growth, as evidenced by the bicycle posters, that this book illustrates.”

See more here and if you have $130 spare, holler.
Via sprinting for signs twitter spot.

1908.

February 19, 2010

Christ, we could not get away with this now in 2010, absolutely no way! Brilliantly visionary for the time though.

Taken from the book Death on the Streets – Cars and the mythology of road safety.

Seen.

Cycle Sports.

January 29, 2010

Taken from the book entitled ‘Cycling and cycle sports’ by DK publications.

Quite an interesting book for the novice and also a lot of amusing pictures of what appear to be 80s cyclists too. Look out for the triathlete… Wow is all I am saying!

Inside Stories.

March 31, 2009

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A collection of Rapha labels.

“Now available as a book, the labels discreetly stitched inside Rapha products provide a treasure trove of insights into some of the many facets of road riding. Whether celebrating the derring-do of the great legends, or simply reflecting on the humble joy of discovering rare parts in a yard sale, each label features exclusive artwork by designer Ben Aquilina”.

I have bought and paid for mine suckers!

Get on the site and grip yours before they run out, they only cost £10… that is the same as say… two and a bit McDonalds meals, which are no good for you anyway.

Nagasawa Book Project.

March 12, 2009

I know nothing about this apart from what the front cover looks like.

Scouting the internet brings only information in either french, Italian or Japanese and I dare say they are probably only saying something like what I say in the first line of this post anyway.

The mystery!

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Via Hype in Japan which appears to be a blog based in France.

A photographic history of the competition bicycle

December 14, 2008

comppedersen

Seen over at the Vintage bicycle press
176 pages, 9.5″ x 12″, hardcover.

Vintage Bicycle Press’ new large-format book explores the world of cycling competition through the actual bicycles ridden by champions and amateurs.

Their bicycles are shown in The Competition Bicycle, from a rare 1890s racing High Wheeler to Tony Rominger’s 1994 hour record bike. In between are 32 carefully selected bicycles. Most are the actual, unrestored machines ridden by the great champions like Fausto Coppi, Gino Bartali, Eddy Merckx, Greg LeMond, Andy Hampsten and many others.

These bikes tell their stories through sweat-stained handlebar tape and well-worn saddles. Each bicycle represents a milestone in the history of cycling competition, as well as in the development of cycling technology.

The Competition Bicycle is a celebration of beautiful bicycles lovingly crafted for one purpose only: to go as fast as possible.

Author : Jan Heine
Photographer : Jean-Pierre Pradères

livre-ouvert-ok


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