Posts Tagged ‘frame’

Bristol Bespoked. Photographs.

June 12, 2011

There was some great stuff on show, Ricky Feather’s track frame was stunning, as was Donhou’s road bike built for Tim of the Daily cycle and let’s not talk about the Dura Ace equipped Brother track bike. Feather and Donhou were also awarded prizes for best Best track frame and best Utility bike respectively, as voted for by the exhibitors.

All in all a top day with some amazing things to see and also plenty of ideas if you were thinking about a build, which is pretty much me the whole time but sans cash.

Bristol Bespoked
are already calling for exhibitors for 2012 so start pestering your local builder now, so we can see next year’s show being twice as big!

More pics of the day here at my flickrspot.


Donhou track goodness.

May 4, 2011

Tim commutes on an old geared 90′s mountain bike nicknamed the “Monster Truck” and he came to me wanting something special as a second bike. He wanted a track frame for the road and something thats light, fast and a lot of fun, something thats a real contrast to his everyday ride, in his words “I want this one to be like a Ferrari in my shed”.

It’s got a sweet bar/stem combo, dropped seat stays, track ends with built in adjusters and I love the paint, every time I look at it reminds me of a Pantone swatch book. The frame is now waiting in the ‘shop for a full build…

Looking good, Tim. Shouts out to Tom Donhou on this one… It’s great to see new builders prosper.

Kinfolk Killer.

April 15, 2011

Spotted on my flickr stream this morning and I couldn’t resist having a further look. All I can say is: Clean!


Hard Rossin Pursuit.

March 21, 2011

Believe it or not, this Rossin pursuit actually started out as a road frame. It came into possession of the talented and dedicated designer/artist/fabricator named Olli Erkkila, and he was inspired to recreate it as a lo-pro… read more

Whether or not this bike is a hack-job, it looks absolutely rad as f***ing hell and I have to give big shouts to Oli, the brain behind such a killer machine.

I wonder how hard it is too web the joints like this? *reaches for fibreglass and hacksaw* No seriously, I am going to try this… my TT frame cost me very little so a bit of R&D won’t hurt too much.


Look Scan.

January 31, 2011


Look Mondrian 2011.

January 17, 2011

Jesus Christ. Why have I not got ( read saved ) enough £££ for a 586 yet. *Drools on keyboard*. I need a slap in the face right now followed by some hard liquor. Shit.


Cannibal Bike specs.

January 16, 2011


Donhou Hotness.

January 16, 2011

Donnie has only just started building frames but already his work is looking amazing. If you are based anywhere near Norfolk and you are in the market for something, be sure to check this guy out.

Oh and Sparky, and you Tim, I want to see what he did for you when they are finished!

See more here.

Stall Holder Pass.

December 3, 2010

We headed up to the ‘tradesman’ entrance where the flurry of smug faces with badges on chests that read ‘stall holder’ entered empty handed and exited with frames slung over shoulders. Each time I turn up to a cycle jumble – normally an hour or so before official opening and for reasons I still do not know – I can’t help but look on in absolute envy at these men who trade goods before the curtain goes up.

One morning, this morning, the early rise had paid off. As my partner and I stood, watching the line of items enter and exit the building like leaves carried by an army of ants, there was an opportune gap. The man who had been standing there, guarding the door had gone for his flask of tea. My girl, now standing beyond the golden threshold gestures at me to enter also, me, being a softy, I shake my head from side to side, she grabbed my hand and pulled me along behind her. I was in and it was 8.30am, not the 10am advertised on the flyer, and all thanks to the wife.

Did I manage to grab the vintage cycling bargain of the century? Nope, not really. I actually spent 50p. Right before we were escorted from the beige leisure centre and consequently shamed by the stern organiser, I managed to pick up one of my most treasured possessions today; A book, the 1979 published TI Raleigh story, 52 pages of printed wonder and all featuring the magnificently dominant TI Raleigh team of the 70s. My favourite. Now, having been read, and the pictures ogled it now sits proudly on my bookshelf.

I recently visited Tuscany for Le Coq Sportif’s L’Eroica and, while I was there to ride the race, I was mostly looking forward to the jumble. I wanted to see how the Italians do things and, well, it was mostly the same as here in the U.K but in another language, and outdoors, and hot, with more good stuff. I wandered around, a few paper Euros in my pocket, eyeing up Delta brakes, boxed gruppos and complete bikes dripping in Campagnolo but I found myself, after a few rounds, settling at one stall.

He had, as well as the obligatory sea of componentry, a large and fruitful selection of golden era magazines, badges, bunting, stickers, catalogues, mascots and postcards. Dandy. He wore an oil stained blue jumper, sleeves rolled up, with grey hair and chunky fingers and he chatted with his apple-eating friend. I leafed through a section of Pink Cyclisme cards. On the cover, Maertens, Thévenet, Poulidor, Hinault, to name but a few and all with penned signatures. I pick them up and enquired as to the price of said items. Then, after a lesson, shouted in Italian and pointed out with sausage fingers about the greatest cyclists of all time we agreed on €1 each. I bought ten.

I love a cycle jumble, me, I think they are great. All of that goodness under one roof, the hardware going for an asking price and not to the highest bidder, where you can handle the items and not just be reliant on jpegs on screens, the folks you meet have knowledge and enthusiasm dribbling off of their tongues and relish any opportunity to inform you of the origin of any item sat on their wooden wallpaper pasting table, you can slice their delight with a knife. It is also a social gathering where friends meet, you’ll most likely come across many unmanned stalls as Barry will be over there chatting with Pete. Unfortunately for me there won’t be one around these parts for a good few months as they only seem to spring up in the warmer months, but I suppose that leaves me with plenty of time to garner one of those ‘stall holder’ passes.

AITA & Bilenky.

November 29, 2010

Bilenky Cycle Works was founded in Northeastern Philadelphia in 1983 with the goal of meeting the specific needs of the individual cyclist. Stephen Bilenky recognized the need for specially proportioned frames and components for riders of all shapes and sizes, and began creating a range of custom products to answer the outfitting needs of recreational, fitness and utility cyclists from all over the world.

BCW’s philosophy of perfectionism shines through in every bike they build. Their frames can be compared to a bespoke suit, tailored to fit both the rider’s aesthetic and physical needs. Whether it’s waiting four weeks for a retro-fit to come back, or four months for that super-customized nit-picked-over-every-detail dream bike, one ride on a Bilenky bike will prove that it is in a league of its own.

For the month of November, Art in the Age and Bilenky Cycle Works will demonstrate the craft of custom framebuilding. By creating a miniature version of the Bilenky shop within AITA, Stephen Bilenky and his crew will highlight the specific build qualities and artistry that set a Bilenky bicycle apart from the rest. Join us at AITA for a unique behind the scenes look at this rare craft.

Thanks to Dan at AITA for pointing these vids out, they are ace and Stephen Bilenky comes across as such a lovely man!

Via Art in the Age.


November 18, 2010

Who needs seatstays when you have chain stays like these? Seriously, I have never seen a hencher set of legs.

The Pegoretti ‘Big Leg Emma’. Tonk!


Legor Asymmetry.

November 10, 2010

God, this is georgeous. Look at those rear stays… beautiful.

Via. Originally spotted at Tracko.

Bianchi Celeste.

October 12, 2010

Langdale Lightweights.

July 29, 2010

I had never heard of Langdale until my pal Jon told me about them, and after a quick peruse around the ‘history’ section of their website I can safely say that the name will now stay logged in the hard drive, aka my memory banks.

Some more great pics to be found here.

The Real Deal.

April 27, 2010

Gios Torino Aerodynamic

Torino, Italy early 80’s. Rare NOS Aerodynamic. Unique Gios with triangular profile rear stays. Shifters on top of down tube. Columbus Air tubing. In pristine shape and in original Gios box. Sold.

Damn. The one that got away.


April 7, 2010

… It’s on it’s way!

My ( actually, it isn’t mine anymore ) 1989 Duell track pursuit is on it’s way to NYC. Jeremy, look after it and I hope you get as much enjoyment out of riding it as I did.

Recollections of Ilkeston.

March 19, 2010

I remembered this, as I glanced at it on my desktop this morning so I thought, lengthy as it is, I should post it. So anyone interested in the ins and outs of working for Raleigh Ilkeston’s SBDU should read on.

Words by Mike Mullet.

30 years ago, but here goes.

In the closing years of my Army career (1969 to 1976) I managed and mechaniced for the Combined Service cycling teams which led me to doing the same tasks for the British Cycling Federation at National and International events. This led to an invite from the Raleigh UK team to mechanic for the team on a freelance basis. This I was very happy to do, particularly for such a famous team.
On leaving the service I started framebuilding under my own name but still freelancing for Raleigh and writing a technical column for the UK magazine “Cycling”. The editor at that time was Ken Evans, sadly deceased at an early age.

In 1978 I rang Gerald and asked to visit Ilkeston, the base for the UK team which was managed by George Shaw an ex Raleigh UK based pro. The upshot of the visit was Gerald asked if I would like to work at Ilkeston with a view to taking over from him when he retired.
Would I. Why me? Evidently my freelance work for the team and my weekly column in Cycling had paid off.
Gerald told me I would have to have a formal job interview with his boss, the Design Director of Raleigh – Alan Oakley. Raleigh Chopper fans will be aware of Alan, a revered figure having designed the Chopper on the back of an envelope on a fight to the USA. What a gentleman. The job interview took place one lunch time (and well into the afternoon) at one of the most elite dining establishments in Nottingham with Gerald present. It was one of the most civilised job interviews I have ever had. Happy to say I was offered the appointment of Workshop Manager.


Alf Engers 1987.

February 23, 2010


To Renovate…

February 22, 2010

Or not to renovate? That is the question.

You see, my bicycle, lovely as it is, just doesn’t have the lustre it had 34 years ago when it was wheeled out of the Ilkeston cycle works. The blemishes it has dotted all over it mar it’s appeal to some degree and it is for that very reason I have this mental tussle.

But why would you want to paint out all of that history? Sure it has a few scratches here and there but those scratches allude to it’s racing career and it’s time before me and to paint it would seem like I would be erasing it all. Like the hypnotist in the 2003 film Oldboy removing Dae-Su’s memory for the better. Or is it actually for the better? A friend recently said it would be “like buying the Mona Lisa and having her smile adjusted because you liked it better that way”.

That said, the owner of the previously mentioned Mona Lisa painting would be the owner so that individual could do with that paining as they saw fit. Right?

Wrong. A part of me believes that something of history, a classic item ( so long as it is not completely and utterly in need of renovation with blemishes that are of detriment to itself ) should not be tampered with and the possessor of such an item has somewhat of a responsibility of ensuring this. If not for the sake of him/herself then for the sake of the future because once that original paint and original decals are removed, they are gone, for eternity.

But then would a renovation not become part of the frame’s history in itself or would it devalue the item in another 34 years when it is discovered that the frame’s enamel jacket is less like a tube television and more like 30″ plasma screen? In viewing terms the tube worked just fine, showed TV programs, videos no problem but now we need plasma because it ‘looks’ better.

I think if I were to paint my 1976 Raleigh track frame ( SB numbered 969 ) I would completely regret it. It would ‘look’ better, I know it would but I would feel like I have wronged the earth in some way, like I had just removed a facet of it’s workings. I would also ( knowing my love for tradition ) grow to dislike the bicycle and end up selling it. This because in my eyes without it’s o.g jacket it would just be like most other resprayed professional racing frames out there: Void of any sort of credibilty of racing history or heritage.

And is racing history and heritage not the very reason we all love these classic, vintage bicycles in the first place?

Indeed it is and for that reason my bicycle, as it stands gets to live another day in it’s original condition. So like the very 19th century wooden framed windows that I peer out of on this cloudy day, history remains.

Carbon Failures.

February 19, 2010


Found this brilliant website dedicated wholly to broken carbon bicycles and components.

Now the thought had crossed my mind to ditch steel and go carbon for this summer’s build but scrap that, Busted Carbon has turned me right off!

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