Posts Tagged ‘paint’

Pegoretti.

July 20, 2011

Via.

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Bianchi Celeste.

October 12, 2010

Races in Paint.

July 27, 2010

Pat Cleary’s work is amazing, I always wished my pen/brush skills were better than they are.

More info on Pat Cleary’s work can be found here.
Originally spotted at GDB.

Kinfolk goodness.

July 21, 2010

Love this shot, bet that frame looks absolutely delish! Props out to Kyle, fantastic job done there sir.

Seen here and here.

Bare Steel.

June 2, 2010

Still undecided as to what colour to do my Olmo in. Yesterday’s post on Black bikes was food for thought, as were the metallic beauties seen in the original Olmo scans.

New idea. Chris, a long time cycling gentleman from my local store has a few cycles in the ‘colourway’ ( can you call it that? ) seen above. Bare metal. I think it looks awesome and no doubt very easy to acheive with a mere strip of the paint and a clear coat. Although you don’t get the high gloss finish of paint or powder you need never worry about chipped paint again, simply because there is none!

The tussle continues.

Rigi track bike hotness spotted here.

Jean Metzinger. Cubism.

May 13, 2010

At the Cycle-Race Track (Au VĂ©lodrome), ca. 1914. Oil and collage on canvas, 51 3/8 x 38 1/4 inches (130.4 x 97.1 cm).

Seen at the Guggenheim.

Paint.

April 29, 2010

Could the bottom picture be of 2009 National Champ, Kristian House supping at the elixir of life? The ever versatile Coca Cola. That stuff saved my life once, atop the cret de Chatillon. Doomed I was, doomed until handed the magical red tin by Joe, or was it Kieran? I don’t remember. I do remember however, having the ability to ride again, and speak again for that matter once the secret ingredients of the famous American cola had been fully consumed and digested. Unbeatable.

Imressive. Via.
Originally spottted at Tracko.

To Renovate…

February 22, 2010

Or not to renovate? That is the question.

You see, my bicycle, lovely as it is, just doesn’t have the lustre it had 34 years ago when it was wheeled out of the Ilkeston cycle works. The blemishes it has dotted all over it mar it’s appeal to some degree and it is for that very reason I have this mental tussle.

But why would you want to paint out all of that history? Sure it has a few scratches here and there but those scratches allude to it’s racing career and it’s time before me and to paint it would seem like I would be erasing it all. Like the hypnotist in the 2003 film Oldboy removing Dae-Su’s memory for the better. Or is it actually for the better? A friend recently said it would be “like buying the Mona Lisa and having her smile adjusted because you liked it better that way”.

That said, the owner of the previously mentioned Mona Lisa painting would be the owner so that individual could do with that paining as they saw fit. Right?

Wrong. A part of me believes that something of history, a classic item ( so long as it is not completely and utterly in need of renovation with blemishes that are of detriment to itself ) should not be tampered with and the possessor of such an item has somewhat of a responsibility of ensuring this. If not for the sake of him/herself then for the sake of the future because once that original paint and original decals are removed, they are gone, for eternity.

But then would a renovation not become part of the frame’s history in itself or would it devalue the item in another 34 years when it is discovered that the frame’s enamel jacket is less like a tube television and more like 30″ plasma screen? In viewing terms the tube worked just fine, showed TV programs, videos no problem but now we need plasma because it ‘looks’ better.

I think if I were to paint my 1976 Raleigh track frame ( SB numbered 969 ) I would completely regret it. It would ‘look’ better, I know it would but I would feel like I have wronged the earth in some way, like I had just removed a facet of it’s workings. I would also ( knowing my love for tradition ) grow to dislike the bicycle and end up selling it. This because in my eyes without it’s o.g jacket it would just be like most other resprayed professional racing frames out there: Void of any sort of credibilty of racing history or heritage.

And is racing history and heritage not the very reason we all love these classic, vintage bicycles in the first place?

Indeed it is and for that reason my bicycle, as it stands gets to live another day in it’s original condition. So like the very 19th century wooden framed windows that I peer out of on this cloudy day, history remains.

Don’t sweat the technique.

January 29, 2010

Several people have asked me how to paint the flutes on a crank, so I finally decided to put together a page with my “technique,” which can also be used for flutes on seatposts, as well as pantographing, and other engravings and cut-outs.

So if you have ever wondered how it is done or you need some advice / assistance on doing it yourself read more here.


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