Posts Tagged ‘ti’

Essential item No.2. 1976 SBDU Team Raleigh Track.

August 3, 2011

3 years ago I saw an ad for a steel track frameset, my size, within my budget and looking good. So off I went to Bristol to pick it up. I arrived, checked the frame and agreed to make the transaction. It was a mid 70s silver enamelled Carlton, badged as a Marcarini, lovely it was, Fischer crown and everything. Yes please. But before I swapped my cash for the merchandise he offered to show me another frameset. “OK” I said. He then brought this out: A 1976 Team Raleigh track SB969 in ‘the’ colourway.

Dilemma. I’d always wanted one of these and this was again my size. It looked a bit tatty and the fork was rusted to within an inch of it’s life but then it’s not everyday someone presents you with one of these in your size. Even though the Raleigh was in much poorer condition to the Carlton he wanted more money for it. More than my budget. I got him to put wheels in both, stand them up side by side and I stared at them for a bit. The mental tussle went on for half an hour and then Bang! it finally happened. I saw the potential in that Red, yellow and black, I had chosen to burn the budget and I had bought the Raleigh.

Three years later and I still use it daily, rain or shine. It is scratched, battered and bruised but continuing to work like a beautifully oiled machine, hell it is a beautifully oiled machine! I love it and I can’t see it leaving my hands anytime soon. I’v had many bikes since this has been around but they’ve all gone to new homes, all except one.

I want to live in southern France one day and when I do I want this in the lounge.

Previous Raleigh posts.
The awesome Recollections of Ilkeston.
Classic lightweights on Raleigh SBDU.

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Lomo for iPhone. Raleigh travellin’.

July 5, 2011

Raleigh train.

June 6, 2011

Found this image chilling on my desktop… what an awesome shot!

Speaking of Raleigh. Van Vliet 82.

May 12, 2011

Stall Holder Pass.

December 3, 2010

We headed up to the ‘tradesman’ entrance where the flurry of smug faces with badges on chests that read ‘stall holder’ entered empty handed and exited with frames slung over shoulders. Each time I turn up to a cycle jumble – normally an hour or so before official opening and for reasons I still do not know – I can’t help but look on in absolute envy at these men who trade goods before the curtain goes up.

One morning, this morning, the early rise had paid off. As my partner and I stood, watching the line of items enter and exit the building like leaves carried by an army of ants, there was an opportune gap. The man who had been standing there, guarding the door had gone for his flask of tea. My girl, now standing beyond the golden threshold gestures at me to enter also, me, being a softy, I shake my head from side to side, she grabbed my hand and pulled me along behind her. I was in and it was 8.30am, not the 10am advertised on the flyer, and all thanks to the wife.

Did I manage to grab the vintage cycling bargain of the century? Nope, not really. I actually spent 50p. Right before we were escorted from the beige leisure centre and consequently shamed by the stern organiser, I managed to pick up one of my most treasured possessions today; A book, the 1979 published TI Raleigh story, 52 pages of printed wonder and all featuring the magnificently dominant TI Raleigh team of the 70s. My favourite. Now, having been read, and the pictures ogled it now sits proudly on my bookshelf.

I recently visited Tuscany for Le Coq Sportif’s L’Eroica and, while I was there to ride the race, I was mostly looking forward to the jumble. I wanted to see how the Italians do things and, well, it was mostly the same as here in the U.K but in another language, and outdoors, and hot, with more good stuff. I wandered around, a few paper Euros in my pocket, eyeing up Delta brakes, boxed gruppos and complete bikes dripping in Campagnolo but I found myself, after a few rounds, settling at one stall.

He had, as well as the obligatory sea of componentry, a large and fruitful selection of golden era magazines, badges, bunting, stickers, catalogues, mascots and postcards. Dandy. He wore an oil stained blue jumper, sleeves rolled up, with grey hair and chunky fingers and he chatted with his apple-eating friend. I leafed through a section of Pink Cyclisme cards. On the cover, Maertens, Thévenet, Poulidor, Hinault, to name but a few and all with penned signatures. I pick them up and enquired as to the price of said items. Then, after a lesson, shouted in Italian and pointed out with sausage fingers about the greatest cyclists of all time we agreed on €1 each. I bought ten.

I love a cycle jumble, me, I think they are great. All of that goodness under one roof, the hardware going for an asking price and not to the highest bidder, where you can handle the items and not just be reliant on jpegs on screens, the folks you meet have knowledge and enthusiasm dribbling off of their tongues and relish any opportunity to inform you of the origin of any item sat on their wooden wallpaper pasting table, you can slice their delight with a knife. It is also a social gathering where friends meet, you’ll most likely come across many unmanned stalls as Barry will be over there chatting with Pete. Unfortunately for me there won’t be one around these parts for a good few months as they only seem to spring up in the warmer months, but I suppose that leaves me with plenty of time to garner one of those ‘stall holder’ passes.

Spinwell visits Reynolds.

October 19, 2010

Think of Reynolds and most will instantly think of 531, the tube of choice for racing bikes over countless years and not to mention the numerous tour wins that were gained aboard this cro-moly steel pipe. Since 1958 up until the modern day, the Reynolds butted tubeset has dominated the roads, Anquetil, Merckx, and Hinault all used Reynolds exclusively in their Tour victories. Now there’s an accolade.

I was recently lucky enough to be offered a bit of time to walk around the Reynolds factory and to have a quick chat with the MD about all things Reynolds and what came clear at my 45 minute mini tour was that Reynolds are still as passionate about the metal tube as they have always been. I may sound surprised at this but I really was, I honestly thought I’d be greeted by super high tech billion pound machines churning out carbon for motorbikes but what I actually saw looked like it hadn’t changed since Reynolds began in 1898. (more…)

Still loving Raleigh.

October 13, 2010

Exploded.

June 15, 2010

Gotta love an exploded team Raleigh.
Seen at Cool Steel’s Flickr spot.

Raleigh Snaps.

May 11, 2010

So, remember last week I mentioned that I planned to fit some tubular tyres onto my newly purchased wheels? Well, I have only gone and done it! I can also report that: Yes, it is a right bast**d fitting them but I can also report that it is a lot less of a pain in the ass than I first thought.

Happy as Larry I am now, happy as Larry.

Raliegh SB 951…

April 30, 2010

…On Ebay.

Buy it Now for only £875! If only.

Raleigh Greatness.

April 19, 2010

Aaaah, the warm feeling I get when I spot the livery of a Professional Raleigh… Magnificent!

Raleigh got a new Fork.

March 23, 2010

Yup, after over a year of looking I managed to find what I was looking for: An undrilled fischer crown track fork with a long enough steerer that was good enough to chrome.

Result.

Recollections of Ilkeston.

March 19, 2010

I remembered this, as I glanced at it on my desktop this morning so I thought, lengthy as it is, I should post it. So anyone interested in the ins and outs of working for Raleigh Ilkeston’s SBDU should read on.

Words by Mike Mullet.

30 years ago, but here goes.

In the closing years of my Army career (1969 to 1976) I managed and mechaniced for the Combined Service cycling teams which led me to doing the same tasks for the British Cycling Federation at National and International events. This led to an invite from the Raleigh UK team to mechanic for the team on a freelance basis. This I was very happy to do, particularly for such a famous team.
On leaving the service I started framebuilding under my own name but still freelancing for Raleigh and writing a technical column for the UK magazine “Cycling”. The editor at that time was Ken Evans, sadly deceased at an early age.

In 1978 I rang Gerald and asked to visit Ilkeston, the base for the UK team which was managed by George Shaw an ex Raleigh UK based pro. The upshot of the visit was Gerald asked if I would like to work at Ilkeston with a view to taking over from him when he retired.
Would I. Why me? Evidently my freelance work for the team and my weekly column in Cycling had paid off.
Gerald told me I would have to have a formal job interview with his boss, the Design Director of Raleigh – Alan Oakley. Raleigh Chopper fans will be aware of Alan, a revered figure having designed the Chopper on the back of an envelope on a fight to the USA. What a gentleman. The job interview took place one lunch time (and well into the afternoon) at one of the most elite dining establishments in Nottingham with Gerald present. It was one of the most civilised job interviews I have ever had. Happy to say I was offered the appointment of Workshop Manager.

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Raleigh Snap.

January 12, 2010

Speedwell Birmingham.

January 5, 2010

Looking at the base of the poster adorned with Luis Ocana you will see that he is riding a Titalite Speedwell bicycle. I did not know this but Speedwell bicycles were made here in Birmingham and more specifically Witton, only paces from where I spent my early years.

Does anyone have more info on Speedwell? As the scale of this find is massive for me! I would love to find out more on this Birmingham based manufacturer but the trusty net does not yeild great information on this occasion.

The bicycle seen here is:
1977 Speedwell Titanium

Lightweight professional road bike (8.2kg). Titanium framework #67706 equipped with Campagnolo Record/Super Record plus some tuning parts. Early lightweight aero tubular rims from Assos, Switzerland, rear wheel with Campagnolo HiLo hub.

Spotted here.
Big up Joe for the heads.

Also kind of weird don’t you think – Speedwell / Spinwell both from Birmingham. Hmmmm.

6th December.

December 6, 2009

Team Raleigh on Ebay.

November 13, 2009

speed_001

titel

speed_076

speed_067

speed_066

Professional lightweight road bike from Raleigh Bicycle Development, Ilkeston with Reynolds 753 framework #SB3116 finished in TI-Raleigh team coloures red, black, yellow. Selected equipment with Campagnolo Super Record, Huret Jubilee gear, CLB magnesium brakes, Pelissier 2002 hubs, Mavic SSC rims, Cinelli bar/stem, Premier SL220 suede saddle, etc.

This, another fine example of British craftmanship just recently sold on U.S Ebay for nigh on $2000.

Some lucky ( and flush ) fellow has just landed themselves with an absolute beauty of a specimen there!

Call off the search.

May 20, 2009

Yes! Last week I managed to find and grip one of these, an Ilkeston built SBDU Raleigh Track frame in my size!!! Not this exact one but this model and colourway and yes even in the flesh it is still one the best looking frames I ever clapped eyes on and I am super stoked.
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I cannot wait to ride it, I just have to wait for my forks to be returned form the chrome shop and then I will be on it.

This ladies and gentlemen will be my summer whip of 2009 and hopefully for many summers to come.


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